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Morden Collegiate Institute
Grade 12

Welcome to Grade 12 at Morden Collegiate!  Whether you are a returning grade 11 student or new to our school, below you will find information about courses that are available to for you to register for in your grade 12 year.

Courses will be listed in two categories; Core courses (required by the province in order to receive your Manitoba High School Diploma) and Optional courses (courses you elect to take based on your interests and career or post-secondary education goals).  Optional courses are available based on teacher availability and number of registrations and are not guaranteed based on schedule conflicts and availability.

We will schedule an information evening for parents and new students as well as host an information session for current grade 11's prior to the course selection process each year.  Information is also available at that time regarding scheduling “spares" into student schedules.

Core Courses

Mathematics

There are three Mathematics options to choose from to achieve the required Mathematics credit.  Students may select more than one.  Only one will count as the required course and any additional courses will count as optional courses.

Applied Math

1 credit course

Prerequisite: Applied Math 30S

The Applied Mathematics 40S course is designed for students who require, or are interested in, a challenging math course, but don't need to take Calculus at a post-secondary level.

The course consists of five major units.  The unit titles along with the general outcomes for each unit are listed below.

  • Financial Math  (General Outcome: Develop number sense in financial applications)
  • Logical Reasoning  (General Outcome: Develop logical reasoning)
  • Relations and Functions  (General Outcome: Develop algebraic and graphical reasoning through the study of relations)
  • Design and Measurement  (General Outcome: Develop critical thinking skills related to measurement design)
  • Probability  (General Outcome: Develop critical thinking skill related to uncertainty)

There is a provincial achievement test (exam) at the end of this course that all students must write.

Students should have completed the Applied Mathematics 30S course prior to taking the Applied Mathematics 40S course.

Students enrolled in Applied Math are required to purchase a TI-83 Plus or TI-84 or TI-84 Plus Graphing Calculator.  Estimated cost around $150.00.

Essentials in Mathematics

1 credit course

Prerequisite: Applied Math 30S or Pre-Calculus Math 30s or Essentials in Mathematics 30S

Essentials in Mathematics 40S is intended for students whose post-secondary planning does not include a focus on mathematics and science-related fields.  Essentials in Mathematics 40S is a one credit course that emphasizes consumer applications, problem-solving and decision-making as well as number sense and number use. Students are expected to work both individually and in small groups on mathematical concepts and skills encountered in a technological society.

At the present time a Provincial Assessment (Standards Test) is administered at the completion of this course. The topics covered in this course include and are worth 20% of the final grade.

  • Analysis of Games and Numbers 
  • Vehicle Finance 
  • Home Finance
  • Statistics
  • Geometry and trigonometry
  • Precision Measurement
  • Business Finance
  • Career life
  • Probability

Pre-Calculus Mathematics

1 credit course

Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus Math 30S with a recommended grade of 70%.

Grade 12 Pre-calculus Mathematics (40S) is designed for students who intend to study calculus and related mathematics as part of post-secondary education. It builds on the topics studied in Grade 11 Pre-calculus Mathematics and provides background knowledge and skills for the study of calculus in post-secondary institutions.

The course comprises a high-level study of theoretical mathematics with an emphasis on problem solving and mental mathematics.

Units of Study:

Polynomial Functions

Radical and Rational Functions

Trasformation of Functions

Combination of Functions

Exponential and Logarithmic Functions

Trigonometric Functions

Trigonometric Equations and Identities

Permutations, Combinations and Binomial Theorem

Assessment of Grade 12 Pre-calculus Mathematics may include assignments, reflective journals, quizzes and tests. A provincial achievement exam will be written at the end of the course.

Students enrolled in pre-calculus math are required to purchase a T1-83 or T1-84 calculator.

English Language Arts

There are three English Language Arts options to choose from to achieve the required ELA credit.  Students may select more than one.  Only one will count as the required course and any additional will count as optional courses.

Comprehensive Focus

1 credit course

Prerequisite: ELA: Comprehensive Focus 30S or ELA: Transactional Focus 30S or ELA: Literary Focus 30S

This English course balances practical and artistic purposes and uses of language. Because the course is “comprehensive", we will divide our study equally between pragmatic and aesthetic texts. Students will learn to think critically and independently while developing their skills in reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing and representing. Students will become increasingly proficient in using language to communicate effectively to an audience, express themselves clearly, and select appropriate forms for their purposes. They will learn to manage data and information efficiently, and to work collaboratively in small groups.  Students will produce and explore oral, written, and visual texts that inform, persuade, analyze, foster understanding and empathy, reflect culture, express feelings and experiences, and bring enjoyment. Literature studies will include novels (group and independent study), non-fiction, poetry, contemporary drama, visual text, and film.  Students will write the Grade 12 Provincial Standards Assessment (Exam) at the end of the semester.

 Literary Focus

1 credit course

Prerequisite: ELA: Comprehensive Focus 30S or ELA: Transactional Focus 30S or ELA: Literary Focus 30S

This English course emphasizes artistic purposes and uses of language. It entails an intensive analysis of literary forms, genres, techniques and elements.  Because the course is “literary", we will focus our study (70%) on aesthetic, literary texts. Students will learn to think critically and independently while developing their skills in reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing and representing. Students will become increasingly proficient in using language to communicate effectively to an audience, express themselves clearly, and select appropriate forms for their purposes. They will learn to select and use literary devices and techniques effectively, and to work collaboratively in small groups.  Students will produce and explore oral, written, and visual texts that inform, persuade, analyze, foster understanding and empathy, reflect culture, express feelings and experiences, and bring enjoyment. Literature studies will include classic literary novels (group and independent study), non-fiction, poetic forms and devices, Shakespearean Tragedy, contemporary drama, visual text, and film.  It is recommended that students complete English Literary Focus 30S prior to taking the course.  Students will write the Grade 12 Provincial Standards Assessment (Exam) at the end of the semester.

Transactional Focus

1 credit course

Prerequisite: ELA: Comprehensive Focus 30S or ELA: Transactional Focus 30S or ELA: Literary Focus 30S

This English course emphasizes practical purposes and uses of language. Because the course is “transactional", we will focus our study (70%) on pragmatic texts. Students will learn to think critically and independently while developing their skills in reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing and representing. Students will become increasingly proficient in using language to communicate effectively to an audience, express themselves clearly, and select appropriate forms for their purposes. They will learn to manage data and information efficiently, and to work collaboratively in small groups.  Students will produce and explore oral, written, and visual texts that inform, persuade, analyze, foster understanding and empathy, reflect culture, express feelings and experiences, and bring enjoyment. An emphasis will be placed on inquiry and research, with application to a formal research report/project.  Literature studies will include memoirs (group and independent study), non-fiction, poetry, speeches, visual text, and documentary film.  It is recommended that students complete English Transactional Focus 30S prior to taking the course.  Students will write the Grade 12 Provincial Standards Assessment (Exam) at the end of the semester.

Physical Education/Health

There are two delivery methods to achieve the Grade 12 physical education credit.  Students may only select one.

Regular Delivery

1 credit course

Prerequisite: Physical Education 30F

This compulsory full-credit course is designed to help youth take greater ownership of their own physical fitness, to encourage them to seek out activities that interest them, and to engage in active lifestyles into their futures. Students will study topics related to fitness management, nutrition, personal and social development, and healthy relationships. The focus of this content will be on health and personal planning.

Students will be graded for completion of the course with a Complete or Incomplete designation.

Students should be prepared to pay a nominal fee for activities requiring community space. (ie bowling - $2.00 per day, curling - $2.00 per day and golf - range balls).

*Financial assistance is available to any student who may be interested in taking courses with associated costs or fees.  Please see Ms. Fenn for more information.

Outdoor Education Focus

1 credit course

Prerequisite: Physical Education 30F

The Outdoor Education course will introduce students to useful survival and other practical skills for the outdoors. It will also provide ample opportunities to explore alternative pursuits to physical activity to promote lifelong, healthy active lifestyles.  Students will develop an understanding of stewardship in relation to the environment and being global citizens.

Furthermore, students will demonstrate qualities of teamwork and independence as they develop their skills to become better equipped in their knowledge and practice of safety and participating in activities in the outdoors. The skills learned in the course are plentiful and course content and experiments require community involvement and/or use of facilities, equipment, etc.  Some of the activities and supports for this program may have associated costs. 

This course will focus on physical fitness and outdoor skills, personal growth through team building and leadership roles and environmental awareness and wilderness appreciation.

Students will be provided with a course calendar at the beginning of the semester to help facilitate student scheduling.

Women's Fitness & Wellness Focus

1 credit course

Prerequisite: Physical Education 30F

This compulsory full-credit course is designed to support a focus for young women to develop a greater ownership of physical fitness, to encourage seeking out activities of interest to them, and to motivate engagement in active lifestyles into their futures.

Students will study topics related to fitness management, nutrition, personal and social development, and healthy relationships. The focus of this content will be on health and personal planning for wellness and fitness, emphasizing topics and issues that are relevant to the lives of young women.

Students will be graded for completion of the course with a Complete or Incomplete designation.

Students should be prepared to pay a nominal fee for activities requiring community space. (ie bowling - $2.00 per day, curling - $2.00 per day and golf - range balls).

*Financial assistance is available to any student who may be interested in taking courses with associated costs or fees.  Please see Ms. Fenn for more information.

Optional Courses

Accounting

 1 credit course

Prerequisite: none

How many scientists, mathematicians, poets, and historians do you know? Accountants are consistently among one of the top-10 highest paid in-demand jobs in Canada. 

Accounting 40S continues using what was learned in Grade 11 Accounting as well as covering new topics.

New topics include:

  • special journals; combination journals; subsidiary ledgers
  • merchandising and payroll
  • a study of periodic and perpetual inventory control.
  • an introduction to cost accounting for a manufacturing business.
  • end-of-year adjustments with accruals.
  • Simply Accounting (computerized accounting package) 

Advanced Placement Calculus

1 credit course
Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus 40S with a teacher recommended grade of 75%.

This is an intensely challenging, higher-level math course where the student should be motivated to do university level work in high school.

The topics covered include:

I.      Functions, graphs and limits

  • limits of functions
  • asymptotic & unbounded behaviour
  • continuity as a property of functions

II.    Derivatives

  • derivatives at a point
  • derivatives as a function
  • second derivatives
  • application of derivatives
  • computations of derivatives

III.  Integrals

  • Riemann sums
  • interpretations and properties of definite integrals
  • application of integrals
  • Fundamental Theorem of Calculus
  • techniques of antidiffentiation
  • applications of antidiffentiation
  • numerical approximations to definite integrals

The AP Calculus Global Exam is written in early May.  Course evaluation is based on tests, assignments and a final exam.

Students enrolled in AP Calculus are required to purchase a T1-83 or T1-84 calculator.

*Financial assistance is available to any student who may be interested in taking courses with associated costs or fees.  Please see Ms. Fenn for more information.

 

Advanced Placement Literature & Composition

 1 credit course

Prerequisite: ELA: Comprehensive Focus 30S or ELA: Transactional Focus 30S or ELA: Literary Focus 30S

In the AP course in English Literature and Composition students are engaged in the careful reading of literary works.  Through each study they sharpen their awareness of language and their understanding of the writer's craft.  They develop critical standards for the independent appreciation of any literary work and they increase their sensitivity to literature as a shared experience.  To achieve these goals, students study the individual work, its language, characters, actions and themes.  They consider its structure, meaning and value and its relationship to contemporary experience, as well as to the times in which it was written.

Students who select AP English are expected to be proficient readers who enjoy the challenge of doing a great deal of extra reading.  Students are generally given a summer reading list that they are expected to complete by the time school starts in September.  These works are then discussed in regular English courses and in special AP tutorials held throughout the year.  Besides the reading, students are instructed on how to write expository style literary essays.

This broad base of experience is intended to prepare students for the AP examination written in May of each year.  In essence the AP English class is a university level course taught at high school. Because of the intensive nature of the course, students choosing AP English earn one English credit at Morden Collegiate. It may be used as a second English for university entrance.

Band

1 credit courses

Through this four year program, students will explore music through group performance on wind and percussion instruments.  Students in band will study high quality wind band literature and be held to a high, yet attainable standard of performance.  Students will learn performance skills, musical notation, music theory, music history, and the proper playing mechanics of their instrument.  Emphasis will be placed on the ability to communicate fluently and expressively with the musical language.

Concerts, festivals, trips, and retreats are considered a part of each course, and it is an expectation that all band students participate in these.

*Financial assistance is available to any student who may be interested in taking courses with associated costs or fees.  Please see Ms. Fenn for more information.

Jazz Band

Audition will be held prior to the course to determine placement in an appropriate ensemble.

The Senior Jazz Band provides an enrichment opportunity for students wanting to learn about jazz and perform in a smaller group setting.  It extends upon the concepts learned in Junior Jazz Band.  Auditions for this group are held late in the spring of the previous school year.  Rehearsals are held outside the regular school day. A rehearsal time will be determined after the group has been selected.

Students in the course will learn various idioms of the jazz language and various jazz styles (swing, ballad, rock, latin).  They will also learn jazz forms, jazz chords, jazz scales, and improvisation.  Similar to concert band, the ability to communicate fluently and expressively using the jazz language will be emphasized.

Concerts, festivals, trips, and retreats are considered a part of Senior Jazz Band, and it is an expectation that all students participate in these. 

*Financial assistance is available to any student who may be interested in taking courses with associated costs or fees.  Please see Ms Fenn for more information.

Biology

1 credit course

Prerequisite: Biology 30S 

 

The Biology curriculum is designed to engage students in science learning by promoting the following:

Science inquiry: Students are encouraged to converse, ask penetrating questions,

and then seek to explore their own constructed explanations alongside scientific explanations through guided research, writing, and planned investigations.

Problem solving: Students apply their acquired expertise and knowledge in novel, often unforeseeable, ways.

Decision making: As students identify rich, large-context problems, questions, or issues related to the life sciences, they pursue new knowledge that will assist them in making informed, rational, defensible decisions.

The Biology 40S Curriculum focuses on two main themes; Genetics and Biodiversity.

The course is divided into the following five units:

Part I – Genetics

Unit 1: Understanding Biological Inheritance

Unit 2: Mechanisms of Inheritance

These units focus on an in-depth understanding of heredity and the molecular aspects of genetics.

Part II – Biodiversity

Unit 3: Evolutionary Theory and Biodiversity

Unit 4: Organizing Biodiversity

Unit 5: Conservation of Biodiversity

The evaluation consists of lab work, project work, assignments, tests and a final exam.

Career Development

1 credit course

Prerequisite: None

The grade 12 curriculum gives students opportunities to internalize all the learning outcomes in a classroom setting and spend up to 60 hours applying and personalizing these outcomes in their career and community experience. The grade 12 emphasis is on the transition from high school to post-secondary training and preparation for employment.

Choir

1 credit course

Prerequisite: Choir 30S

Choir 40S is a year-long course. Students will receive one credit for this course. Classes are rehearsal-based, with the majority of class time spent studying repertoire. The course is an extension of Choir 30S with emphasis on expanding the students' repertoire to include a wider variety and more challenging repertoire. Music selections include, but are not limited to, other languages such as Latin, French and German, Italian and 20th century music.

Students in Choir 40S will be expected to develop, grow and model leadership in all areas of the curriculum, as established in Choir 30S:

Making Music

  • Acquire singing skills including vocal production, breath management, tone quality, diction, dynamics, intonation and phrasing
  • Develop skills in listening, vocal blend, vocal confidence, independence and discipline

Creating Music

  • An expanding ability and opportunity to generate ideas, revise, refine and share creative works

Connecting in Music

  • Opportunities to make personal connections to music and understanding the role of music in the world

Responding to Music

  • Ability to provide evidence of their developing understanding of music through deepening and thoughtful responses. Evidence of growing and music-related vocabulary as it is used in responses.

Travel opportunities may become available through festival/competition performances.

*Financial assistance is available to any student who may be interested in taking courses with associated costs or fees.  Please see Ms. Fenn for more information.

 Vocal Jazz Choir

1 credit courses

There are auditioned and non-auditioned vocal jazz ensembles.

Vocal Jazz 30S and 40S is a year-long course. Students will receive one credit for this course. Classes are rehearsal-based, with the majority of class time spent studying repertoire. The ensemble (30S and 40S) demands time and commitment from the members as we rehearse before school (7:45am – 8:45 am, Monday and Wednesday).  Sight reading skills and vocal experience are an asset to the ensemble.

Vocal Jazz 30S and 40S are expected to develop, grow and model leadership in all areas of the curriculum as established in Vocal Jazz 10S/20S:

Making Music

  • Acquire singing skills including vocal production, breath management, tone quality, diction, dynamics, intonation and phrasing
  • Develop skills in listening, vocal blend, vocal confidence, independence and discipline

Creating Music

  • An expanding ability and opportunity to generate ideas, revise, refine and share creative works

Connecting in Music

  • Opportunities to make personal connections to music and understanding the role of music in the world

Responding to Music

  • Ability to provide evidence of their developing understanding of music through deepening and thoughtful responses. Evidence of growing and music-related vocabulary as it is used in responses.
  • Travel opportunities will become available through festival/competition performances.

Computer Science

1 credit course

Prerequisite: Applied Math 30S or Pre-Calculus Math 30S & Computer Science 30S

This course takes an in-depth look at problem solving through computer programming by building on previous experience in Computer Science 20S and 30S. Students will develop knowledge, skills, and attitudes applicable to situations beyond computer science. Students will look at the history of computer science, discuss current trends in the Information Communication Technology field, and learn project development through computer programming.

Current Topics in First Nations, Metis & Inuit Studies

1 credit course

Prerequisite: None

Grade 12 Current Topics in First Nations, Métis, and Inuit Studies supports the empowerment of students through the exploration of the histories, traditions, cultures, worldviews, and contemporary issues of Indigenous peoples in Canada and worldwide. Students gain knowledge and develop the values, as well as the critical thinking, communication, analytical, and inquiry skills, that will enable them to better understand past and present realities of Indigenous peoples. Additionally, exploration of topics such as self-determination, self-government, and language and cultural reclamation allows students to understand and work towards the post-colonial future envisioned by Indigenous peoples.

Dramatic Arts

1 credit course

Suggested Prerequisite: Drama 30S. Students should have a genuine interest in drama.

This course runs during the school day schedule.

The curriculum is organized around a set of drama elements, which are developed at different levels of complexity over the four years. The drama elements are the essential components around which teachers build programs for specific groups of students. (The drama categories are listed under Dramatic Arts 20S). This advanced course continues to emphasize the elements and extends the experience to scripts and literature appropriate for dramatic interpretation. The class will participate in multiple public performances. All courses will be taught in our specialized theatre classroom and supported by our Backstage Theatre class.

English as an Additional Language

1 credit course
Prerequisite: EAL 31G or similar results on a Placement Assessment.

Students in this course help to build community with other EAL students in the classroom. They prepare to use English with increasing accuracy in most classroom and social situations. They will study and interpret a variety of texts, further develop their presentation skills, and extend their range of research skills.

Family Studies

1 credit course

Suggested Prerequisite: Family Studies 30S

Please note: Family Studies 40S is one of the academic subjects approved to meet general entrance requirements at Manitoba universities.

This course is for grade 12 students interested in entering the fields of teaching, social work, health/home care, geriatrics, or other helping professions.

The focus of the course is on developing communication and observation skills and understanding human behaviour as it relates to the family structure. Students are expected to complete various assignments and research activities, as well as participate in individual presentations and group discussions. Students will study topics on human growth and development from adolescence to old age, relationships, family life cycle, history of the family, character development, conflict resolution and additional topics that are current and relevant to families.

French

1 credit course

Prerequisite: French 30S

Over the four years of coursework, students will be expected to communicate orally and interact spontaneously. They will listen in order to understand the communicated message. Students will plan and write coherent texts to communicate the message. Students will read a variety of texts, for various purposes, and demonstrate understanding orally, in writing or visually. They will demonstrate a general knowledge of francophone cultures and apply knowledge of francophone cultures to interactions with others.

The focus of class time will be oral communication then reading and writing. Students are assessed according to message, fluency and accuracy.

French Language Arts

1 credit course

Prerequisite: French Language Arts 30S or permission from the instructor.

The curriculum for this course stresses development of information management skills. Students will be given opportunities to work with print and non-print media in order to assimilate information and then express informed opinions. Students will also be asked to assess the esthetic and entertainment value of non-print media and use them as springboards for various expressions of creativity and imagination.

Evaluation of this course will include a variety of methods; short quizzes, projects, assignments, oral presentations and a final project.

Graphics Arts

1 credit course

Prerequisite: Graphic Arts 30S

Students will build on previous experience from Graphic Arts 20S and 30S. Students should now be confident in their ability as a graphic designer. Majority of the semester will focus on building a professional portfolio and working with real clients and real situations. Video editing will be explored if there is time.

Global Issues /Enjeux mondiaux: citoyennete et durabilite

1 credit course

Prerequisite: None

The purpose of Global Issues is to allow students the opportunity to explore the social, political, environmental and economic impact of a variety of contemporary and emerging issues in the world.

Law

1 credit course

Prerequisite: None

Law 40S is a course which helps an average person understand Canadian law and how it works.  Topics covered include criminal, tort, constitutional, contracts and family law.  Activities include video presentation, court visitations and guest speakers.  These presentations may be oral, video and/or dramatic in nature.

The course also spends time examining historical and future changes in the law.  A better understanding of the facts and moral aspects and consequences of Canadian law and the law in general is a major objective of the course.

Chemistry

1 credit course

Prerequisite: Chemistry 30S and Pre-Calculus 30S or Applied Math 30S.

Chemistry 40S continues to develop the concepts and themes introduced in Chemistry 30S. This course is designed for further post-secondary study in the sciences. It is a rigorous course covering the following topics.

  1. Kinetics
  2. Chemical Equilibrium
  3. Acid base Equilibrium
  4. Solubility Equilibrium
  5. Electrochemistry
  6. Atomic Structure

Physics

1 credit course

Prerequisite: Physics 30S AND Pre-Calculus 30S or Applied 30S.

Physics 40S is a continuation of the Physics 30S course.  The specific topics go into more detail than the 30S course.  The math required is more involved and includes problems that are linear and non-linear (quadratic) in nature. 

The units to be covered in this course are:

1)     Mechanics

  • Kinematics, Dynamics, Momentum, Projectiles, Circular Motion, Work and Energy

2)     Fields

  • Exploring Space, Low Earth Orbit, Electric & Magnetic fields

3)     Electricity

  • Electric Circuits, Electromagnetic Induction

4)     Medical Physics

Psychology

1 credit course

Prerequisite: none

Psychology 40S course will expose students to the five major themes/topics found in the field of psychology that represent broad content area. They are:

  1. Introduction and Research Methods
  2. Biopsychology
  3. Developmental Psychology
  4. Cognitive Psychology
  5. Variations in Individual and Group Behaviour

    In this course, the scientific method will be used to discover ways of understanding the complexities of human thought and behaviour, as well as differences among people.

    Studying psychology in high school will teach students several lifelong skills, such as dealing with issues proactively, solving problems, learning, and nurturing healthy relationships. Students will learn to understand themselves and to deal with issues in their own lives. Among personal matters and concerns are inner conflicts, relationships with parents and peers, and intimacy. Students will also understand some of the societal problems, such as drug dependency, aggression, and discrimination. Upon completion of Psychology 40S course, students will be able to apply what they learned to their daily lives.

Technical Theatre

1 credit Course

Prerequisite:  None

This is not a performance course. Building upon the grade 11 course, grade 12 students will take on a more creative and design responsibilities in the production aspects of theatre; Lighting, Sound, Stage Construction, and Set Painting.  Leading crews of younger students, the grade 12 students become teachers and mentors themselves demonstrating excellent comprehension of concepts and skills taught in the technical theatre field.

Theatre Production

1 credit course

Prerequisite: Audition with course instructor.

Note:   This class will meet outside of the school day in both semesters, until the completion of the show in the Spring

This is a practical course involving the rehearsal and production of theatre and a show. The course will include rehearsal techniques, script analysis and practical experience in design, technical theatre and stage management.  The course will culminate in a public performance.  The course will be taught in our state of the art, flexible theatre space. This course will be supported by our technicians and design teams from our Backstage Theatre class.

Visual Arts

1 credit course

Prerequisite: Students selecting this course should have a genuine interest in art and be able to display a satisfactory level of technique.

Visual Art 40S is a continuation of the elements and medias studied in Visual Art 10G, Visual Art 20G & Visual Art 30S.  The Visual Art 40S course places a stronger focus on the student's ability to develop projects using the media, elements of art and principles of design studied in the past 3 courses.

The focus of the course is creativity and personal expression. Students will explore the roles the artists plays in society and determine a focus for their own art.

Students in Visual Art 40S are responsible for the planning and execution of the art show and auction.

Students will be evaluated through studio work and written research projects.

ART FEE - $15.00 plus supplies as mentioned in Visual Art 20G.

*Financial assistance is available to any student who may be interested in taking courses with associated costs or fees.  Please see Ms. Fenn for more information.

Woodworking Technology

1 credit course

Prerequisite: Woodworking Technology 30G

In Woodworking Technology, students will develop skills in furniture construction.  The course will explore these areas through in-class lectures and assignments, as well as through individual project work.

Supplies you will require are:

  •       White Art Eraser
  •       Compass
  •       Lined Paper (at least 50 sheets)
  •       Calculator
  •       Safety Glasses
  •       Tape Measure

There are costs for materials associated with this course.  Students may select from a number of projects and types of materials, so costs do vary.

*Financial assistance is available to any student who may be interested in taking courses with associated costs or fees.  Please see Ms. Fenn for more information.

Yearbook

1 credit course

Prerequisite: none

This course is designed around creating the MCI yearbook, but with more responsibility in an editor position compared to Yearbook 30S.  Students will further their skills from Yearbook 30S, but will be more responsible for design and editorial choices, and layout options. Further creative freedom will be given with choices for fonts, colours, and design templates..